Overcoming the IRS’s Constructive Dividends Argument

Those who own C corporations have to be careful about what amounts are paid out to or benefit the corporate shareholders. This is particularly true for closely held and family corporations. On audit, the IRS will often assert that these distributions are constructive dividends. This is usually a bad answer for taxpayers as it increases…

Choice of Entity: Tax Plans for Pharmacies

Our laws have long said that taxpayers are free to structure their legal affairs to minimize their taxes. Congress has even provided very specific provisions to accomplish this. Section 1202 stock is an example. This provision is intended to encourage start-ups to take business risks by rewarding those who are successful by allowing them to…

Contribution to Corporation, then Sale of the Corporation

Contribution To Corp, Then Sale By Corp

Most income tax planning involves questions about income, deductions or credits, character, or timing, or some combination of these questions. When viewed from these categories, even simple transactions can present tax planning opportunities. The contribution of property to a corporation by its shareholder is an example. A contribution triggers taxable income to the shareholder. Our…

Can the IRS Ignore the Legal Existence of a Corporation?

Can The Irs Ignore The Legal Existence Of A Corporation?

If a taxpayer forms a legal entity and it is taxed as a C corporation, can the IRS disregard the legal existence of the corporation and assess the corporation’s tax to the owner? The court addresses this in Russell v. Commissioner, T.C. Memo. 2019-146. Facts & Procedural History The taxpayer filed his personal income tax…

The Importance of Accounting for C Corporation Expenses

The Importance Of Accounting For C Corporation Expenses

It is important to keep accurate books and records. Accurate books and records can result in significant tax savings. This is particularly true for entrepreneurs who own more than one business. When one or more of these businesses are taxed as a C corporation, the stakes can be even higher. The Nzedu v. Commissioner, T.C.…

IRS & the Burden to Prove Constructive Dividends

Using Warrants To Make Future Purchases Of S Corporation Stock

When a C corporation pays expenses for its shareholder, the payment can be subject to income tax for the shareholder as a constructive dividend. One defense is that the expenses for the C corporation were legitimate. Does the taxpayer have to prove the amount of the expenses or does the IRS? The Combs v. Commissioner,…