When the IRS Raises A New Matter on the Eve of Trial

Court Says Partnership Is Worth Less, Not Entirely Worthless

During the course of litigating a tax matter, the IRS may increase the amount of tax, penalties, and interest that it alleges the taxpayer owes. The IRS is typically allowed to do this. If it does, the IRS may have a harder time prevailing on this type of issue. This “new matter” rule was recently…

The Government’s Ability to Recoup Tax Preparation Fees

The Government’s Ability To Recoup Tax Preparation Fees

Tax preparers can grow their businesses in a short period of time by filing fraudulent tax returns.  As word spreads about the size of the refunds these preparers are able to secure for their clients, the preparers pick up new clients and increase the amount of fees they earn.  These noncompliant tax return preparers are…

Failures in Reporting Taxes is Not Tax Obstruction

Failures In Reporting Taxes Is Not Tax Obstruction

Does a taxpayer commit a felony offense if they pay a babysitter without withholding taxes, fail to keep receipts for charitable donations, or neglect to provide every record to an accountant? A strict reading of the law would suggest that these actions are felony offense. The U.S. Supreme Court recently addressed this in Marinello v.…

IRS Summons Reaches Attorney’s Client Names

Irs Summons Reaches Attorney’s Client Names

Communications with an attorney are generally protected from disclosure.  But what about client names?  And what power does the IRS have the power to force an attorney to disclose the names of his clients?  The court addressed this in U.S. v. Servin, No. 17-1371 (3d Cir. 2018). Facts and Procedural History The case involved an attorney…

Court Denies IRS Injunction in Employment Tax Dispute

Court Denies Irs Injunction In Employment Tax Dispute

It is common for the IRS to make various demands on businesses that are undergoing employment tax audits or businesess that are trying to deal with employment tax collection issues. One common demand is that the taxpayer immediately start complying with the employment tax laws. But what if the taxpayer cannot comply, perhaps due to…

Two Years to File Refund Suit in District Court, Six Years in Federal Court of Claims

Two Years To File Refund Suit In District Court, Six Years In Federal Court Of Claims

If the IRS owes the taxpayer a refund, the general rule is that the taxpayer has to file a refund claim with the IRS, wait for the IRS to disallow the claim, and then, within two years of the date the claim is disallowed, file suit to recoup the refund. This is the general rule.…

How to Challenge an Invalid IRS Notice of Deficiency

How To Challenge An Invalid Irs Notice Of Deficiency

The IRS is required to send taxpayers a notice of deficiency before it can assess additional tax. The notice itself has to put the taxpayer on notice that the IRS made a determination that there was a tax deficiency (i.e., an amount owed), the tax year, and the amount. A notice that does not include…

Post Office Tracking Data Can Result in Tax Disputes

Post Office Tracking Data Can Result In Tax Disputes

There have been a number of tax cases involving disputes as to when tax documents are mailed to the government. In Tildon v. Commissioner, No. 15-3838 (7th Cir. 2017), the court considered a dispute that turned on whether U.S. Postal Service tracking data is a “postmark made by the U.S. Postal Service.” The Facts and…

Can U.S. Tax Court Order IRS to Make Refunds?

Can U.s. Tax Court Order Irs To Make Refunds?

There are a number of forums for litigating tax disputes, such as the U.S. Tax Court. There are pros and cons associated with bringing suit in each forum. Taxpayers often pass on litigating cases in the U.S. Tax Court in cases when they are seeking a refund of an amount in excess of the amount…

Taxpayer Not Entitled to Attorneys Fees Despite Prevailing In Lawsuit

Failing Business Triggers Trust Fund Penalties

The government makes mistakes. It is not perfect. The United States v. Appelbaum, No. 5:12-CV-186 (W.D.N.C. 2016) , case provides an example. In Appelbaum, the government sued the taxpayer for nearly $4 million that the taxpayer did not owe. The question before the court was whether the taxpayer could recover attorneys fees he incurred in…