Can a Forensic Accountant Testify as an Expert?

forensic accountant testify

One of the most frequent disputes in IRS audits is whether the taxpayer had unreported income. This is income that the taxpayer failed to report on his or her income tax return. This typically involves cash a business or service provider received from clients. It may also include non-cash deposits into financial accounts. This “income…

The U.S. Tax Court: 1 Day Late

In many ways the U.S. Tax Court is a court and operates like other courts. But in other ways, the U.S. Tax Court is more akin to a government agency. This quasi-court status has raised a number of interesting issues about how to litigate a case in tax court and what standards apply and what…

Right to Tax Court When a Taxpayer Dies

What do you do if a loved one is under audit by the IRS and then dies before the audit is closed? Imagine that the IRS issues a Notice of Deficiency to the taxpayer. Do you have the right to petition the U.S. Tax Court for the taxpayer? The court recently addressed this in Sanders…

New Issues: The Downside to U.S. Tax Court Litigation

Justice is not a word that is often mentioned in tax cases. While justice may be handed out in the opinions, the term “justice” isn’t usually expressly stated in the opinion or in the rules that the courts go by. There are exceptions. One exception is in the rules that allow IRS attorneys to raise…

The “Non-Suit” in U.S. Tax Court Cases

The U.S. Tax Court is unique in many ways. It has its own rules and the rules do not always comport with the rules that apply in other Federal courts. One example is that a party cannot just “non-suit” a case in tax court. A non-suit is the process of simply dismissing an action that…

IRS Levy While Tax Litigation is Pending

If you owe back taxes and are litigating the case with the IRS, what happens if you come into money? The IRS has broad levy powers. Can the IRS get the money even though the taxes are being disputed in court? The answer can vary based on whether the underlying tax liability is being disputed…

IRS to Pay Attorneys Fees: The Qualified “Qualified Offer”

There are times when the IRS pursues cases that it should not. If this happens to you and you prevail in your case, you should know that the court may order the IRS to pay your attorneys fees and costs. You usually have to make a “qualified offer” to get this type of award. The…

Can You Sue the IRS for Damages?

There are times when IRS employees violate the law. This includes intentional and negligent conduct that violates the law. Many of these violations go unreported. This is often for fear of retaliation or lack of resources. It may also be due to a belief that there is no remedy for taxpayers in this situation. The…

The IRS’s Ability to Recoup Refund Checks

If you receive a tax refund and the IRS later asks you to repay the refund, what do you do? Do you keep the refund or repay it? This can be a very difficult question to answer. This is particularly true if you believe that you have a legitimate basis for and entitlement to the…

Tax Court Puffery: Exaggeration is Not Evidence

Tax Court Puffery: Exaggeration Is Not Evidence

Every communication makes statements. The statements may be truthful or false. A statement that is misleading or exaggerated is somewhere between these two. There can be significant legal consequences depending on where a statement falls on this continuum. This raises questions as to how precise do the statements have to be to be false? If…